Food & Cooking Encyclopedia

Please note: this page is a work in progress, let me know if you have any ideas or suggestions for additions!

  • Chia Seeds: Salvia hispanica, commonly known as chia, is a species of flowering plant in the mint family, Lamiaceae, native to central and southern Mexico and Guatemala. The 16th-century Codex Mendoza provides evidence that it was cultivated by the Aztec in pre-Columbian times; economic historians have suggested it was as important as maize as a food crop. It is still used in Mexico and Guatemala, sometimes with the seeds ground or with whole seeds used for nutritious drinks and as a food source. Click here for detailed nutrition information from Self Nutrition Data. Salvia hispanica – Wikipedia
  • Ketogenic diet: The ketogenic diet is a high-fat, adequate-protein, low-carbohydrate diet that in medicine is used primarily to treat difficult-to-control (refractory) epilepsy in children. The diet forces the body to burn fats rather than carbohydrates. Normally, the carbohydrates contained in food are converted into glucose, which is then transported around the body and is particularly important in fuelling brain function. However, if there is very little carbohydrate in the diet, the liver converts fat into fatty acids and ketone bodies. The ketone bodies pass into the brain and replace glucose as an energy source. An elevated level of ketone bodies in the blood, a state known as ketosis, leads to a reduction in the frequency of epileptic seizures. Ketogenic diet – Wikipedia
  • Macerate: Maceration is softening or breaking into pieces using a liquid. Maceration is often confused with marination, which is the process of soaking foods in a seasoned, often acidic, liquid before cooking. The only important part is that maceration is the chief means of producing a flavored alcoholic beverage, such as cordials and liqueurs. Maceration (food) – Wikipedia
  • Meringue: Meringue, is a type of dessert, often associated with Swiss and French cuisine, made from whipped egg whites and sugar, and occasionally an acid such as cream of tartar or a small amount of vinegar. Meringue – Wikipedia
  • Paleolithic (paleo) Diet: The paleolithic diet is a nutritional plan based on the presumed diet of Paleolithic humans. It is based on the premise that human genetics have scarcely changed since the dawn of agriculture, which marked the end of the Paleolithic era, around 15,000 years ago, and that modern humans are adapted to the Paleolithic diet.The Paleolithic diet consists mainly of fish, grass-fed pasture raised meats, eggs, vegetables, fruit, fungi, roots, and nuts, and excludes grains, legumes, dairy products, potatoes, refined salt, refined sugar, and processed oils. Proponents argue that modern human populations subsisting on traditional diets, allegedly similar to those of Paleolithic hunter-gatherers, are largely free of diseases of affluence and that Paleolithic diets in humans have shown improved health outcomes relative to other widely-recommended diets.The paleolithic diet is a controversial topic among dietitians and anthropologists. An article on the website of the National Health Service of the United Kingdom Choices refers to it as a fad diet. The diet is also known as the paleo diet, paleodiet, caveman diet, Stone Age diet, and hunter-gatherer diet. Paleolithic diet – Wikipedia
Pastry Blender

Pastry Blender

  • Pastry Blender: A pastry blender or pastry cutter is a kitchen tool used to mix a hard (solid) fat into flour in order to make pastries. The tool is usually made of narrow metal strips or wires attached to a handle, and is used by pressing down on the items to be mixed (known as “cutting in”). It is also used to break these fats (shortening, butter, lard) into smaller pieces. Pastry blender – Wikipedia
  • Sterol: Sterols, also known as steroid alcohols, are a subgroup of the steroids and an important class of organic molecules. They occur naturally in plants, animals, and fungi, with the most familiar type of animal sterol being cholesterol. Cholesterol is vital to animal cell membrane structure and function and a precursor to fat-soluble vitamins and steroid hormones. Sterol – Wikipedia

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